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High culture and tall chimneys

Art institutions and urban society in Lancashire, 1780–1914

By James Moore

High culture and tall chimneys

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Book Information

  • Format: Hardcover
  • ISBN: 978-1-7849-9147-0
  • Pages: 328
  • Publisher: Manchester University Press
  • Price: £75.00
  • Published Date: March 2018
  • BIC Category: Cultural Studies, Urban communities, The arts: general issues, Landscape art & architecture, History of art, 19th century, c 1800 to c 1899, HISTORY / Modern / 19th Century, HISTORY / Europe / Great Britain, ARCHITECTURE / Urban & Land Use Planning, SOCIAL SCIENCE / Sociology / Urban, ART / Popular Culture, ART / European, ART / History / General, ART / General, Museum, Historic Sites, Gallery & Art Guides, Humanities / Modern history to 20th century: c 1700 to c 1900, Humanities / British & Irish history, Urban Communities, Landscape Art & Architecture, The arts / History of art & design styles: c 1800 to c 1900

Description

This new study examines how nineteenth-century industrial Lancashire became a leading national and international art centre. By the end of the century almost every major town possessed an art gallery, while Lancashire art schools and artists were recognised at home and abroad. The book documents the remarkable rise of visual art across the county, along with the rise of the commercial and professional classes who supported it. It examines how Lancashire looked to great civilisations of the past for inspiration while also embracing new industrial technologies and distinctively modern art movements. This volume will be essential reading for all those with an interest in the new industrial society of the nineteenth century, from art lovers and collectors to urban and social historians.

Author

James Moore is Lecturer in the School of History, Politics and International Relations at the University of Leicester

Contents

1 Introduction: art in the first industrial society
2 Lorenzo in Liverpool: William Roscoe, civic myths and the institutionalisation of urban culture
3 An 'ornament to the town'? The Royal Manchester Institution and early public art patronage in Manchester
4 From private to civic: the diverse origins of the municipal art gallery movement
5 A 'solid foundation'? Art schools and art education
6 The art of philanthropy? The formation and development of the Walker Art Gallery
7 A problem of scale and leadership? Manchester's municipal ambitions and the 'failure' of public spirit
8 Challenging 'the ocean of mediocrity and pretence'? The alternative visions of the Whitworth and Harris Galleries
9 The 'rise and fall' of the municipal art gallery movement? The public and private dimensions of local civic art
Index

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