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Intelligence, security and the Attlee governments, 1945–51

An uneasy relationship?

By Daniel Lomas

Intelligence, security and the Attlee governments, 1945–51

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Book Information

  • Format: Hardcover
  • ISBN: 978-0-7190-9914-4
  • Pages: 296
  • Publisher: Manchester University Press
  • Price: £75.00
  • Published Date: December 2016
  • BIC Category: Espionage & secret services, United Kingdom, Great Britain, Politics & government, Military intelligence, European history, Modern History, POLITICAL SCIENCE / Intelligence & Espionage, HISTORY / Europe / Great Britain, Military Intelligence, Society & social sciences / Politics & government, Humanities / British & Irish history

Description

Drawing on recently released documents and private papers, this is the first book-length study to examine the intimate relationship between the Attlee government and Britain's intelligence and security services at the start of the Cold War. Often praised for the formation of the modern-day 'welfare state', Attlee's government also played a significant, if little understood, role in combating communism at home and overseas, often in the face of vocal, sustained opposition from its own backbenches. This book tells the story of Attlee's Cold War. From Whitehall vetting to secret operations in Eastern Europe and the fallout of Soviet atomic espionage on both sides of the Atlantic, it provides a fresh interpretation of the Attlee government, making it essential reading for anyone interested in the Labour Party, intelligence, security and Britain's foreign and defence policy at the start of the Cold War.

Author

Daniel W. B. Lomas is Lecturer in International History at the University of Salford

Contents

Introduction
1. Wartime apprenticeship: Labour and intelligence during the Second World War
2. Lacking intelligence? British intelligence, ministers and the Soviet Union
3. The Cold War heats up: propaganda and subversion, 1945-8
4. Britain's secret Cold War offensive: ministers, subversion and special operations, 1948-51
5. The special relationship? Ministers, atomic espionage and Anglo-American relations
6. Defending the realm: Labour ministers, vetting and subversion
7. Empire, Commonwealth and security
Conclusion: intelligence and the Labour governments, 1945-51
Index

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